AI Ethics Terminology in Development – communication of principles and communication in principles

Organizers: Rebekah Rousi (University of Vaasa), Ville Vakkuri, Erika Halme, Marianna Jantunen, Pekka Abrahamsson

At the dawn of an increasingly intelligent technological society, the need to identify and address ethical issues arising from the technology and its use is ever more crucial. Rather than being reactive, developers, designers, scholars and decision-makers are becoming increasingly aware of the long-term, sustainable value in being pro-active towards not only identifying current ethical or human moral considerations, but also anticipatory of factors yet to come. Work is currently taking place towards translating existing higher-level artificial intelligence (AI) principles into actionable practice for practitioners and workgroups across the spectrum of technology development, industry and society. ECCOLA is a tool (card set) that aids in the conversion of ethical principles to action points that contextualise and operationalize the principles in the case at hand. Terminology plays an integral role in this conversion as: 1) there needs to be strong semantic correspondence between the intentions and purpose of the principles within the tool; 2) the tool needs to convey these principles in a way that maintains integrity in relation to the original lists while reinforcing understanding within the users; and 3) the terminology itself holds the key towards enforcing ethical practice within the system as it enables transparency, explainability, data quality and human agency – AI ethics through communication.

Workshop aim: to engage participants in expert evaluation of the terminology of the ECCOLA cards against two documents (IEEE ethical principles and a general practical guide). The findings will be synthesized in the creation of an AI ethics scenario that demonstrates how the new terminology could be actualized in practice.

Anyone who is interested in contributing to Ethical AI Development via communication (expertise) is highly welcome. Especially technical communication and terminology experts/researchers/students are encouraged to participate.

Format: face-to-face

References

Blackman, R. (2020). A practical guide to building ethical AI. Harvard Business Review. Available at: https://hbr.org/2020/10/a-practical-guide-to-building-ethical-ai

IEEE. (2021). From principles to practice – Ethically aligned design conceptual framework. Available at: https://standards.ieee.org/content/dam/ieee- standards/standards/web/documents/other/ead1e_principles_to_practice.pdf?utm_medium=undefine d&utm_source=undefined&utm_campaign=undefined&utm_content=undefined&utm_term=undefi ned

Vakkuri, V., Kemell, K. K., Jantunen, M., Halme, E., & Abrahamsson, P. (2021). ECCOLA—A method for implementing ethically aligned AI systems. Journal of Systems and Software, 182, 111067. Available at: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0164121221001643